Where I visited in China


This is the route I took to visit some major cities in China.

Shanghai (2 nights) > High-Speed Rail (1:07)

> Nanjing (2 nights) > Flight (3:00)

> Guangzhou (1 night) > High-Speed Rail (1:20)

> Shenzhen (1 night)> Subway (0:30)

> Hong Kong (5 nights) > Ferry (1:00)

> Macau (1 day)> Ferry (1:00) 

> Hong Kong > Flight (4:30)

> Beijing (3 nights) > High-Speed Rail (0:30) 

> Tianjin (2 nights) > High-Speed Rail (5:00)

> Shanghai (1 night) > Flight > HOME in USA

What’s left of nursing school

I am almost done. It is so exciting! These are the last assignments and exams.

Statistics – 3 homework assignments (due 4/16, 4/23, 4/30), final (on 5/8)

Critical care – case study #2 (finished! Due 4/16), quiz #2 (on 4/16), final (on 4/23)

Community – health education project (due 4/16), quiz (on 4/16), simulation (on 4/20)

Leadership – simulation (on 4/17), final (on 4/25)

Fitocracy: Great “fit” community to keep you motivated

On a Sunday afternoon, I scrolled through the “Featured apps” on my iPhone and saw one called Fitocracy. At first, I was a little bit skeptical but after recording all the exercise I did in the past week, I saw that I was ‘leveling’ up. That was nice, but the best part was that other people gave ‘props’ to show that they are excited about my progress and my workouts. Even though it is a bit of a virtual ‘caring’, you still know that someone out there in the real world made the effort to do so.

I felt that joining the Swimming group was particularly great — probably because I enjoy swimming and it is so awesome see that others are logging in more and less distances. There is so much support in that group and I think that is great.

So instead of telling my real life friends and family about my fitness progress, I’ll share it to a group of online people who will keep me motivated to work out.

Maybe you ought to try it out: http://www.fitocracy.com/.

Community health profile: Evidence-based practice for smoking cessation among Chinese American smokers in NYC

For my community nursing class, it requires a group of 8 students to write a community health profile. We divided up the work, and I’m responsible for writing about the evidence-based practice section. Considering that the NY Times has recently highlighted the fact that all of NYC residents has decreased smoking rates EXCEPT among Asians, I decided to write about that. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/02/nyregion/asian-new-yorkers-resist-anti-smoking-efforts.html

Using Google Scholar, I was able to search a couple of articles and settled on one through PubMed. I went through the NYU Library website to download the PDF file. In case you’re interested, here’s the citation (APA format):

Wu D, Ma GX, Zhou K, Zhou D, Liu A, Poon AN. (2009). The effect of a culturally tailored smoking cessation for Chinese American smokers. Nicotine Tob Res, 11(12):1448-57. Epub 2009 Nov 13.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19915080
Considering that the study takes place in NYC, it should be relatively easy to implement in Chinatown. Now, we just have to get more organizations involved and train CHWs.

One more month

There’s one more month left of nursing school. It’s exciting and scary at the same time. In the next month, there are so many things that are going to happen.

  1. Homework, mid-terms, quizzes. School work.
  2. Job search.
  3. Study for the NCLEX.
  4. Host three more API-NSA meetings.

That’s it for now.

NYU Nursing Accelerated 15-Month Program FAQs

I recently had a former classmate ask me about NYU College of Nursing – Accelerated 15 Month Program. I felt that she had some good questions and thought that others may benefit from this information. Feel free to contact me directly at jesschang07@gmail.com for any other questions or comments. At the time of writing this information, I have completed my 3rd out of 4th semester through the program.

Where did you take your prerequisites?

I took my prerequisites at my first college. However, you can take nutrition and lifespan development online and other courses at any accredited community college or university.

Is the program really intense or is doable?

The program is intense, but it is also very doable. You will learn how to balance your school-home-social life.

How much of the 15 month program is actual lecture and how much is clinical? What is the schedule for classes?

It is about half and half. Two days are clinical days and two days are lecture days. For example, Monday and Wednesday are lecture days. Each class is about 3 hours long, except for Integrative Seminar, which is a class developed for students and the professor to give feedback to each other and gain a greater understanding of nursing as a whole. Then Tuesdays and Thursdays are clinical/simulation days. Each class has a slightly different clinical schedule.

How much is the program? How much is tuition? Are there scholarships?

As of December 2011, tuition is about $19,000 per semester. The program is 4 semesters. Scholarships are available, especially through HSRA. However, I know that most students take out a student loan.

Where do you do clinicals?

I have done my clinical at New York Presbyterian – Cornell (GI), Bellevue (oncology), NYU Langone Medical Center (telemetry), Hebrew Home (rehab and dementia), a local housing site (psych), Mount Sinai (Maternity), and Maimonides (pediatrics). In the spring, I will be at Lenox Hill Hospital and a community health center in Chinatown. You will be able to pick where you want to do your clinical. It is also recommended to go to different hospitals (private and public) to get a feel for the differences in the hospitals.

What is the schedule like for simulation days?

During the 1st semester, the simulation day is from 7:30am – 2:30pm including a 1 hour lunch break. It is crucial to review the skills by reading the book and watching the videos so that you are prepared to perform those skills during class.

During the rest of the time at NYU, the simulations are 3 hours long. There is a scenario posted on Blackboard and pre-simulation questions that must be completed and submitted 48 hours prior to simulation.

Is 15 months = 4 semesters?

Yes.

Do they expect you to remember a lot from the prerequisites?

It is strongly recommended that you understand anatomy and physiology for a first semester class called pathophysiology. If you do not remember, then you will have to play catch up during the semester.

Nutrition will be helpful as well. As long as you understand the basics of microbiology and lifespan development, you will be set. Chemistry – you should understand osmosis. Statistics will play a bigger role in Introduction to Research (taken 2nd semester), but you will be provided a quick refresher at the beginning of the semester.

How are the professors? The exams? The grading? The amount of homework/studying?

I believe all professors are doctorate prepared. Majority of them are great – they care deeply about their subject. The exams and grading are fair. During non-exam weeks, I study and do homework for about 10-15 hours per week. I begin to prepare for exams one week in advance and study for 30-40 hours that week. Most classes also have podcasts available. Some podcasts are directly from the lecture and other podcasts, the professor expects you to listen to them before the exam (they aren’t discussed in class).

Do you recommend the school and program?

Yes. Make sure your finances are okay first though because it is a big investment.

How does specialization work with nurses anyway?

Once you graduate, you will become a BSN, RN. You are allowed to choose any field that interests you. If at any point you want to change, you have the ability to change fields without consequences. Dr. Ea wrote a book called 201 Careers in Nursing, which goes to show you the width and depth of nursing. Johnson & Johnson has also created a fantastic website on exploring nursing specialties, detailing the setting, education you’d need, the typical salary, job characteristics, and some nurses’ stories about the field. To specialize as a RN, you will do certificates. To further specialize, you can return to school for Masters, DNP, and PhD.

What is the dual degree program? When do you apply for it?

NYU College of Nursing allows students to apply for the dual degree program in their 2nd and 3rd semester. It allows students to work for a year after graduation, and return to NYU for their Masters of their choice.

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For current new graduates and NYU Nursing students, I wrote a brief outline of what you can do for you to get a job shortly after graduation.

Update 5/27/2015:

Read NYU’s Accelerated Nursing Program FAQ’s Part II, which is an email of questions from a prospective nursing student, find out if NYU Nursing is worth it, how to pick a good nursing school, and find out if you can afford an accelerated program. Or if you have any further questions, email me.

How Mistakes Can Make You Smarter | Psychology Today

People who think that intelligence is malleable — that we get really good at something by dedicated practicing, not innate brilliance — pay more attention to mistakes. People who think that intelligence is fixed — you’re either good at something or you’re not – pay less attention to, and are less likely to learn from, mistakes.

via How Mistakes Can Make You Smarter | Psychology Today.

I have only skimmed the very surface of an ocean and have yet to dapple the depths of the sea

I have one simulation tomorrow on end of life care from 7:30am to 10:30am.

On Thursday, I have the Populations at Risk final, which I am currently studying for (except that I got distracted and decided to post something on here).

Next Tuesday, I have the Pediatrics final and on Thursday, my last final on Adult and Elder III. Then I will be 3/4 of a nurse. I cannot believe it.

Currently, I feel as if I know a lot (my non-nursing sister and friends keep telling me that I use nursing terms… I swear, it’s a part of me now and it’s hard to stop). However, at the same time, I feel as if I do not know very much at all.

For example, I remember reading about certain diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, when someone comes up to me and says, “Hey, I have MS,” I close my eyes and mentally flip to the pages on that disease state… and unfortunately, so much of it I don’t remember. I am a novice… someone who has only skimmed the very surface of an ocean and has yet to dapple the depths of the sea. In the end, I went home, read up on MS, and I keep reviewing it. That way, next time someone tells me that they have MS, I can respond better.

I guess that is what nursing — and life — is about. Constantly desiring to learn about the new and unknown and staying updated and current are crucial to the patients’ health and well-being.

Ask Questions

Don’t ask something that you can easily search up on Google. Instead, ask questions where answers are not accessible except through a specific person. Now that’s how you sound intelligent! 🙂

The Art of Influence | Psychology Today

Say you’ve been nagging your sister to stop drinking for a long time. You might acknowledge that you’ve pressured her a lot in the past, and that you’re not going to do that anymore, because it is up to her if she wants to keep drinking.

  1. Then at a later point, calmly ask your sister why she might want to stop. She’ll likely share some compelling reasons.
  2. And then, ask her how ready she is to change and what she imagines the positive outcomes would be.
  3. Finally, ask what the next step would be if she were to change. “The reasons she gives you might be the same ones you’ve been giving her all along,” Pantalon says. “But coming out of her mouth, they’re much more powerful.”

via The Art of Influence | Psychology Today.