Asian American Health Portal

This website provides a wide variety of information on Asian American Health. It’s created by the United States National Library of Medicine.

It has health and diseases topics such as blood diseases, cancer, diabetes, the flu, heart diseases, hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, lung diseases, osteoporosis, and general topics.

There is also a complementary/alternative medicine section on acupuncture, herbal medicine, tai chi/qi gong, traditional medicine, and general topics.

http://asianamericanhealth.nlm.nih.gov/

Why it’s important for Asian Americans to get the Hepatitis B vaccine

“1 in 10 Asian Americans is living with chronic Hepatitis B.” via http://www.asianliver.com/en/

“Hepatitis B vaccination is the best protection. The vaccine can be given safely to infants, children, and adults and is usually given as three doses over about 6 months. Other flexible schedules are available. Pregnant women can be given this vaccine as well. Hepatitis B vaccine is very safe, and side effects are rare. This vaccine is the first vaccine that prevents cancer; it prevents liver cancer caused by HBV infection.” via http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4190.pdf

Hepatitis B can be prevented through the Hepatitis B vaccine. via http://liver.stanford.edu/Education/faq.html

Why are Asian Americans at a higher risk for Hepatitis B?

Since 1986, a hepatitis B vaccine has been available and should be given to newborns and children in the United States. The vaccine, however, is unavailable—or has only recently become available—in many parts of the world. You are at higher risk for hepatitis B if you or your mother was born in a region of the world where hepatitis B is common, meaning 2 percent or more of the population is chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus. In most Asian and Pacific Island nations, 8 to 16 percent of the population is chronically infected.

via NATIONAL DIGESTIVE DISEASES INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE (NDDIC)

AAP Updates Polio Vaccine Recommendations

I’m so glad that the number of cases of polio has decreased significantly, from 350,000 cases in 1988 to 1600 cases in 2009. However, wild polioviruses is still common in 4 countries: Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan. For those who travel there, it’s recommended to get an additional dose if they have already received when they were young, or to get the 3 doses at the minimum age.

September 26, 2011 — The American Academy of Pediatrics AAP has updated its recommendation for the administration of poliovirus vaccines, clarifying the standard schedule for immunization, as well as the minimal ages and minimal intervals between doses, according to a policy statement published online September 26 in Pediatrics.

Although the use of oral poliovirus vaccine OPV beginning in the early 1960s led to the elimination of polio in the United States, with the last reported outbreak seen in 1979, wild polioviruses still occur naturally in 4 countries: Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan. The fact that these 4 countries exported the virus to other countries that reported polio cases in 2009 points to the potential for the virus to be brought into the United States, the AAP policy statement says.

Twenty countries reported 1349 cases of polio in 2010, and 14 countries have reported 333 polio cases through August 23 of this year.

Inactivated poliovirus vaccine IPV replaced OPV as the vaccine of choice in the United States in 2000 in an effort to prevent rare but serious vaccine-associated paralytic polio. The current vaccination schedule, designed to produce immunity early in life, calls for 3 doses of IPV at 2, 4, and 6 through 18 months of age, and a fourth dose at 4 through 6 years of age. The AAP recommends that if risk for exposure is imminent, such as when a person travels to 1 of the 4 countries with wild polioviruses, then the doses should be administered at the minimum ages and intervals.

Within the United States, pockets of underimmunized children could lead to an outbreak if the wild viruses migrate to where those children are living, the AAP says.

The AAP statement says that after an individual receives the IPV series of doses, immunity is “long-term, possibly lifelong.” However, another recommendation in its statement is that even adults who completed immunization with OPV or IPV early in life get a single dose of IPV if they are at increased risk for exposure to wild poliovirus in 1 of the countries.

Three combination vaccines and 1 stand-alone vaccine are licensed in the United States. Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B DtaP-HepB-IPV; Pediarix, GlaxoSmithKline, is licensed for the first 3 doses and through 6 years of age. DtaP, IPV, and Haemophilus influenza type b DtaP-IPV/Hib; Pentacel, Sanofi Pasteur is licensed for all 4 doses through 4 years of age. DtaP-IPV Kinrix, GlaxoSmithKline is licensed for the last dose at ages 4 through 6. IPV Poliovax, Sanofi Pasteur, the stand-alone vaccine, is licensed for all doses in infants, children, and adults.

The World Health Assembly set a goal in 1988 of eradicating polio worldwide. At that time, an estimated 350,000 cases of polio existed in 125 countries. That number decreased to 1604 cases in 2009.

Pediatrics. Published online September 26, 2011.

via AAP Updates Polio Vaccine Recommendations.

What do you do when you see someone litter on the subway or smoke in the park?

Today I was sitting on the subway, holding onto my backpack. Through my peripherals, I saw white, mashed up a ball drop onto the subway floor. I looked up at the man who dropped it: he looked to his right with his hands held in front of his lap. He pretended as if nothing happened!

Should I have told him, “Sir, you dropped your trash on the floor. You should pick it up.”? Though he didn’t look like someone who would beat me up if I said anything, I didn’t want to cause any trouble.

For example, one professor of mine told a man in Central Park to not smoke (because since May 23, 2011, it has been illegal to smoke in NYC parks). The man told him to “f you, and his dog.” Yeah… not exactly the most friendly thing you’ll see.

So who should enforce these public rules? Should laypeople like us, or should there be specific people who enforce these rules?

Clean Up – Physically and Emotionally

Today begins Day 1 of Week 2 for my 3rd semester of nursing school (1 more semester left to go!).

Normally, I would have clinical right now — in the nursery, with a postpartum mother, or in the labor & delivery (L&D) room. Instead, a maternity simulation is scheduled for my group from 6pm-9pm so I had all morning and afternoon to clean up.

So I turned up the music on Grooveshark, brought out the trash can, and started dumping. And vacuuming. And wiping down surfaces. And emptying the recycling bins and trash cans. And putting things back to where they belong…

That’s probably the worst part about living without mom and dad. I have to clean on my own… and it doesn’t help that my sister isn’t always helpful. She leaves stuff there and here. Since I’ve been back though, she has been a little bit better about cleaning up though. Just a little.

In terms of cleaning up mentally, I got to think about what I wanted to do down the road.

One thing that I want to do is to get involved with the Asian American community more — even though my Chinese isn’t the greatest. I started reading a book called Asian American Communities and Health so I can’t wait to get more into it.

Another thing is I want to get really good at doing assessments, especially since that plays such a huge role as a nurse. That helps sets what a nurse does versus a lay person. And then I got to think, what do I do with this information? And then I got to make those things happen.

Where I went to in China


 

This is the route I took to visit some major cities in China.

Shanghai (2 nights) > High-Speed Rail (1:07)

> Nanjing (2 nights) > Flight (3:00)

> Guangzhou (1 night) > High-Speed Rail (1:20)

> Shenzhen (1 night)> Subway (0:30)

> Hong Kong (5 nights) > Ferry (1:00)

> Macau (1 day)> Ferry (1:00) 

> Hong Kong > Flight (4:30)

> Beijing (3 nights) > High-Speed Rail (0:30) 

> Tianjin (2 nights) > High-Speed Rail (5:00)

> Shanghai (1 night) > Flight > HOME in USA

Apple Orchards Near NYC – Apple Picking Without a Car! | offManhattan

It’s fall again! It’s my favorite season — less insects, cool weather requiring just a sweater and perhaps an umbrella, and apple cider! For the last two years, I’ve done the Amazing Maize Maze at the Queens County Farm but I hadn’t gone apple picking. This year, instead of heading out to Pathmark for a 1/2 gallon bag of apples, I’ll spend a day at a orchard. After typing apple picking nyc into google, I found a website with the following information. Maybe you will want to go too. Have fun!

If you’re going to bite into a ripe juicy apple on a crisp autumn afternoon, you’d do well to be standing under the tree from which it came. This harvest season, head away from the produce aisle and north of Manhattan to the source, where you can breathe in the fresh countryside air, feel blessed by all the bounty, and stock up for those cobblers, appletinis, and pies your friends and family will be expecting.

We’ve selected six places for your next apple picking adventure, and all you need is a healthy sweet tooth and a train (or bus) ticket to get there.

1. Maskers Orchard | Warwick, NY | maskers.com

Why crop up here: In addition to a breathtaking 200-acre setting (with plenty of romantic corners), horned goats and cute-as-Wilbur pigs, Maskers Country Store has shelves filled with apple butter and fresh jams, and the perfect picnic basket to take all your goods home in.

The Apples: Macintosh, Cortlands, Mutsu Empire, Red & Golden Delicious

When to chew: Saturdays, 9:30a.m.-4:30p.m.

How to get there: Take the New Jersey Transit’s #196 or #197 bus from Port Authority to Willowbrook Station in Warwick. The orchard is 1/2 mile down the road. Take a walk or call Josie’s taxi at 845.986.8073. (45 Ball Road, 845.986.1058)

2. Outhouse Orchards | North Salem, NY | oM Review

Why crop up here: Local families come just for the apple cider doughnuts. Walk past the goats and clucking roosters and into the large market for some fresh produce, Pennsylvania Dutch candies, jugs of apple cider, or jams. You can pick your own pumpkins too. Oh, and those doughnuts.

The Apples: Ten varieties, including Red Delicious, Granny Smith, and McIntosh

When to chew: Open daily April through December, 8:30a.m.-6:00p.m.. Apple picking is 10:00a.m.-5:00p.m.

How to get there: Take Metro North Railroad from Grand Central to Croton Falls station stop. Cabs wait at the station to take city folks to the Orchards, three miles up the road. (Outhouse Orchards, 130 Hardscrabble Road., 914.277.3188.)

3. Fishkill Farms | Fishkill, NY | fishkillfarms.com

Why crop up here: You can also pick your own cherries, berries, peaches, nectarines. Plus, fall means hayrides, live music, and barbecues.

The Apples: There are 15 varieties to chose from, including Idared, Red Delicious, Macoun, Granny Smith, and McIntosh

When to chew: 9:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., 7 days a week

How to get there: Take the Metro North’s Hudson Line to Beacon station. Then take about a 20 minute taxi ride. (9 Fishkill Farm Road, 845.897.4377)

4. Jenkins & Luekin Orchards | New Paltz, NY | jlorchards.com

Why crop up here: This 50-year-old family orchard has delicious apple cider from their own cider mill, local honey, and freshly made treats in the bakery. Pick your own pumpkins for $.35/pound, enjoy a hayride for $2, or do the free corn maze.

The Apples: If you visit the during the last week of September and the first two weeks of October, all 12 varieties—that includes Macoun, McIntosh, Rome Beauty, Red Delicious—will be available.

When to chew: Weekdays and Weekends, 9:00a.m.-6:00p.m.

How to get there: Take the Trailways bus from Port Authority to New Paltz bus (and taxi) station in downtown. Hop a 10 minute cab to the farm. (Jenkins & Leukins Orchards, 69 Yankee Folly Road, 845.255.0999)

5. Wilkens Fruit & Fir Farm | Yorktown Heights, NY | wilkensfarm.com

Why crop up here: Close to FDR’s home, here you can pick peaches, purchase honey, maple syrup, fresh baked fruit pies, apple strudel sticks, and cider doughnuts.

The Apples: 14 varieties, including Gala, McIntosh, Granny Smith, Fuji, Baldwin

When to chew: Friday, Saturday, Sunday, 10:00a.m.-4:30p.m.

How to get there: Take Metro North to Croton Harmon. Call a cab in advance. (1335 White Hill Road, 914.245.5111)

6. Meadowbrook Farm | Wappinger, NY

Why crop up here: Also near the FDR estate and Vanderbilt Mansion, the giant orchard opens this weekend. Feed the goats and chickens, pick pumpkins, and munch on cider doughnuts at the picnic tables.

The Apples: Cortlands, McIntosh, Empires, Red & Golden Delicious

When to chew: Saturday and Sunday, 9:00a.m.-6:00p.m.

How to get there: Take Metro North to New Hamburg. Call 845.297.8294 for A-1 taxi and ride less than 10 minutes. (Meadowbrook Farm, 29 Old Myers Corners Road, 845.297.3002)

via Apple Orchards Near NYC – Apple Picking Without a Car! | offManhattan.