How Nurses Can Successfully Work in the UK

Working in the UK as a nurse could be an excellent career choice with the added bonus of an opportunity to travel. Hospitals within both the National Health Service (NHS) and private sector often conduct recruitment in other countries in order to attract qualified nurses. 

Employment opportunities in the UK 

UK recruiters have acknowledged that there is still a significant demand for full-time nurses. Besides hospitals and clinics, nursing and care homes are also looking for nurses to fill their vacancies.   

So where do you start?

If you are from overseas and want to work in the UK, then naturally you will need to make an application. The process will take some time and a little bit of paperwork. 

The requirements will also differ depending on whether you trained:

  • Within the European Economic Area (EEA)
  • Outside the EEA

The difference is due to the EU’s employment regulations. If you want to speed up the recruitment process, here is some sound advice.

Register with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

Registering is a requirement for all those who wish to work as a nurse in the UK as the NMC is the official organization that regulates the nursing profession.

If you are from overseas, you will also need to secure a UK work permit and find an employer who will sponsor you. Once you have registered with the NMC, you will receive a PIN number which will allow you to practice as a nurse in the UK. You can visit the NMC website to find out more information about registering as a nurse. To secure a placement, you should contact the hospitals directly. 

Once you have submitted your application, you will either be accepted, rejected, or asked to fulfill further requirements, perhaps by undergoing a supervised practice period.

If you have been trained as a nurse outside the EEA, you may have to take a nursing course so you can adapt your existing knowledge and skills to a UK setting. You can then register with the NMC once you have completed this course. Non-EEA trained nurses will also need to pass a competence test (CBT) and a practical skills examination (OSCE). 

The particular type of work permit or visa required will depend on your country of origin. If you are from the EEA region, you can visit the Home Office website for information on how to secure a UK work permit. If you are from outside the EEA and Switzerland, you need to apply for the General Visa – Tier 2.

UK nursing vacancies during the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 crisis has meant that some of the usual hiring practices have been modified, especially for nursing home jobs. For instance, candidates can expect to be interviewed by their prospective employers via a video call. In addition, candidates may only be able to visit the employer’s facility when it is necessary or after they have been hired. 

Even before the pandemic, there was a high demand for nurses in the care home sector. UK recruiters anticipate that this demand will only increase once the current crisis has abated. 

Apply for a nursing position in advance

As mentioned earlier, the UK nursing application process may take some time. It can also be rather complicated. As a result, it is vital that you make your application as early as possible, well before you arrive in the UK.

To expedite the hiring process, make sure you bring all your essential documents, such as:

  • Diplomas
  • Training logs
  • References
  • Birth certificate

Conclusion

Nurses who are interested in working in the UK can expect a warm welcome from recruiters and employers alike. The demand for qualified and skilled nurses is still very high. Although it may require some effort and time to apply, it will be well worth it in the end. If you want to evaluate your career options, go to the NMC and UK Home Office websites to find out more information.  

Guest Post by:

The COVID-19 Crisis: CRNAs to the Rescue

One of the most memorable photos from the COVID-19 pandemic is an image of two healthcare workers in full PPE embracing, face shield to face shield. It’s an even prouder moment for the nursing community as the two are a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) couple from Tampa General Hospital. 

These two CRNAs, Mindy Brock and Ben Cayer, are on the hospital’s airway team. When a COVID patient is in respiratory distress and requires intubation, they are there to sedate and intubate the patient. This is a high-stress situation where time is of the essence, as a COVID-19 patient’s oxygen saturation is known to drop rapidly.

Mindy and Ben are just one example of the roles that CRNAs have played in helping fight COVID-19 across the country. Keep reading to find out more about how CRNAs are contributing to this health crisis.

How CRNA Qualifications Help 

CRNAs are advanced practice nurses who are trained in skills such as intubation, arterial line insertion, central line insertion, and pain management techniques, such as regional blocks. Prior to earning their degree and certification, CRNAs are required to have intensive care unit (ICU) experience so they are well-versed in managing critically ill patients. 

This education and training takes a CRNA to the head of the bed in an operating room, surgery center, or doctor’s office, but the COVID-19 pandemic has CRNAs finding new opportunities to pitch in. 

Continuing the Fight in Medically Underserved Areas

CRNAs have full practice authority in 29 states. This means they can practice without a physician’s supervision. As a result, CRNAs often provide care and airway expertise in traditionally underserved areas. An example would be in a community access hospital where hiring a CRNA can be a cost-effective practice. 

According to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, on March 30, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued a temporary suspension of supervision requirements for CRNAs. This suspension meant hospitals and health systems could utilize CRNAs to the fullest extent of their practice. In a press release about the suspension, Kate Jansky, the AANA President, said this decision allows CRNAs to manage and staff intensive care units as well as staff operating rooms without a physician’s supervision.   

Traveling to the Front Lines

Lots of facilities canceled their elective surgeries to slow the spread and preserve their PPE, and many furloughed CRNAs took the opportunity to travel to some of the hardest-hit areas to provide their services. One example of this was when 30 CRNAs from the North American Partners in Anesthesia (NAPA) group traveled to New Jersey to join in the fight against COVID-19. 

CRNAs traveling to states that were hit hard would work on intubation teams as well as resuscitation teams. When a COVID-19 patient coded in the hospital, the CRNAs would provide assistance in airway management, medication administration, and other potentially life-saving tasks. 

Many CRNAs left behind families and risked their personal health to serve those most in need. Some have even come out of retirement to volunteer. 

Recommended reading: Love Thy Neighbor: Wear a Mask

Even with the right PPE, the work is dangerous. CRNAs are working with the airway, which means they are especially at risk for getting contaminated droplets on their clothing or breathing them in. An estimated 20 percent of the anesthesiology department at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City had contracted the virus as of April 2020, according to the Associated Press. Even with the increased risk many have voluntarily given their time and knowledge.

Returning to the Bedside

Because CRNAs have worked in different ICU settings before going to graduate school, some have opted to return to the bedside during the pandemic. For example, many have stepped into roles helping manage ventilators and airways in ICUs as well as taking patient assignments. 

With elective surgeries on hold in many parts of the country, working in the ICUs or in emergency triage settings allows CRNAs to utilize their hard-earned skills. 

The Takeaway

While 2020 has looked very different for the healthcare community than anyone had anticipated, there are countless stories of nurses, including CRNAs, who have answered the personal call to help. The pandemic has also shined a light on CRNAs’ services and engaged politicians and communities to lobby for expanded practice rights. 

Where there is a health need, nurses — including CRNAs — will answer the call. 

Guest Post by:

Happy International Nurses’ Day

2020 is also the year of the nurse and midwife as designated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in honor of Florence Nightingale’s 200 year anniversary of her birth.

Florence Nightingale is the pioneer of modern nursing.

It is almost very fitting that this is the year of the nurse and midwife. They are on the frontlines of taking care of patients with COVID-19 and must advocate for not only the patient but also themselves. The protection and safety for themselves is vital for taking care of others.

Unfortunately there are already too many stories of nurses who were not equipped with the appropriate amount of personal protective equipment (PPE) and died because of it. Every hospital system should do everything to support the nurses and anyone on the frontline to get the right PPE. No system should deny the nurses safety and their own judgement on what is required to keep them safe.

As for the midwives, I am proud to say that I choose a midwife to be my primary care provider. Thankfully midwives and the hospital system have a good working relationship and thus many best evidenced based practices are utilized. I’ll go over it in more detail tomorrow. Goodnight for now.

Day 1 of Stay Home Stay Safe Order in Michigan

Wow.

So much has happened since I last posted but almost more importantly, this pandemic is just starting to get crazy.

That’s right, just starting.

It’s been 2 weeks since Michigan declared a state of emergency when there were two positive cases of COVID 19. Now there are 1791 confirmed positive cases with 24 people dead.

“Flattening the Curve” by Staying Home

Right now our hospital systems can handle the number of cases. It will still be able to as long as people stay home. This week. YES. This week is the critical week that will help determine if our hospitals will be completely overrun with patients and us having to make decisions on who gets a ventilator and who doesn’t. I hope that we don’t get to that point. But the only way to stop it is by staying home.

I’m happy to see that Michigan has a stay home order. That is a necessary step to get people to take this seriously.
If we continue “Shelter in Place”, meaning staying home and only going out for groceries or essentials once a week, then we will be doing our part to “flatten the curve.”

“Flattening the curve” means that we will not exceed the number of available hospital beds.

If we all do our part, then this graph predicts that we will likely peak in the number of hospitalizations (4877 people) around May 18. As you can see in this graph, 4877 is much lower than our maximum capacity.

Staying home will make it possible to save more lives.
If we as Michiganders stay home, then it is possible to never overload the hospital system and decrease the number of deaths.