Happy New Year 2021

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I’m so glad that it is the new year and that 2020 is over. We have two approved, highly effective COVID-19 vaccines and vaccinations are on their way.

Next week I’m getting the second of two vaccine shots. I felt fine the first day besides a little arm soreness. The second day I felt fatigue, a slight headache and my arm was still sore. By the third day I felt much better. Since then (2 weeks now), I’ve felt fine.

It was a tough decision especially since I’m still breastfeeding and there were no clinical studies on that population yet. While there is unknown data for nursing women for this vaccine, there is plenty of data for providing immunity for our babies through our breast milk and it’s partially due to vaccines. Currently my baby is still doing just fine and progressively developing.

After weighing the risk vs benefits, I believe that the benefits of getting the vaccine outweigh the risks of getting COVID-19.

After speaking with some skeptics, I’ve countered some of their arguments below.

While we may not know the long term consequences of the vaccine, I do know possible long term consequences of COVID-19– neurological changes, difficulty breathing, and death for already over 330,000 Americans. I’m ready to have a 95% effective vaccine protect me from getting COVID-19.

While we may not know how long the immunity will last, I’m ready to take another booster shot if it means protecting my loved ones and anyone I come in contact with.

While we may experience worse side effects from this vaccine compared to other vaccines, I’d rather get known side effects than the potential unknown of how COVID-19 would affect me or others around me.

While this new vaccine development seemed rush, I also know scientists have been studying mRNA vaccines for YEARS, this vaccine has gone through rigorous testing, and the mRNA does not enter the nucleus of a cell and change the DNA. The mRNA provides the blueprint to make the spike protein found on the virus so our body can start making antibodies against this virus.

While there is currently no data due to a lack of studies to suggest a reduction in transmission of COVID-19, most vaccines do reduce the viral load buildup since you are much less likely to get sick. With a decreased viral load it would ideally be more difficult to pass the coronavirus. To suggest that getting the vaccine still would not protect those who haven’t or can’t get the vaccine is just unfounded.

I feel so relieved to be at the beginning of the end. I can’t wait for the pandemic to be over. I can’t wait to experience freedom from masks again. To go back to seeing friends and family, to traveling, and to eating at an indoor restaurant again.

While I know getting the vaccine seems scary, for me, NOT getting the vaccine is even scarier. If you’re ready to go back to any resemblance of normal again:

Be part of the solution, not the problem.

Protect those who cannot get vaccinated by getting vaccinated when the vaccine is available to you.

So here I am. I decided to borrow a book called “Dare to Lead” by Brene Brown. In there, the author discusses how on the flip side of courage is fear. And I definitely feel that. Fear that other people will judge me or think negatively towards me due to me speaking out. Sometimes it just feels easier to stay quiet and not make any waves.

But while we can’t be right 100% of the time, we can try. And we can keep trying to do the right thing. Just like in Frozen 2, when you’re feeling sad, you just have to do the next right thing.

The next right thing is to make a plan to get vaccinated when the vaccine becomes available to you. Let’s end this pandemic.

Posted in Journal.