Finally off of my critical care probation!

sim manYesterday marked the last day of my critical care probation. So what did I do to pass? Instead of being at the hospital, I went to the simulation lab with Mr. Sim Man.

While I did sign a confidentiality agreement not to discuss the specifics of the lab, I can briefly state that it was similar to being at work in the hospital. When you receive a patient, you do a Head to Toe assessment, and determine the next step in care. Is he stable or unstable? If the patient doesn’t respond to your care, what is the next step?

It’s exciting to be off probation now, considering that I’ve been on the unit since December 2013! Now I will have to float to the SICU or CTICU, stepdown, PACU and ER. I’m a little scared to not know everything is (again), but it should be ok!

It’s time to be a Strong Nurse

I was about to ‘boost’ a patient up in the bed with a colleague and I noticed how strong she was. I hardly did anything! Later that night, a patient coded and she started CPR. I noticed that she could do it for such a long time with so much force. She’d take a break just for a few minutes before she took over again.

When I took over, I realized how little endurance I had. I was wiped out after a minute.

After the code, another colleague mentioned how she heard pumping noises right before the code was called. She knew that it was that strong nurse doing CPR.

After I went home for the day, I felt my abs hurting.

This made me think about all the strong nurses there are. Especially in the ICU. Especially her. So she’s my strong nurse idol. I want to be a strong nurse.

I bought new running shoes and workout clothes yesterday from Adidas. I haven’t had a sports bra since high school (I’ve been swimming instead). I have to build my endurance. Do free weights. Etc.

It’s time to be a strong nurse.

And I’m bringing my boyfriend along for the ride.

Strong nurse!

5 Triggers for Palliative Care in the ICU

Right now, I notice that some patients get palliative care too late in their stay at the hospital and sometimes pass away a day later after the consult was put in. We can do better than that to ensure patients are living the way they want to!!

I came across an article in a critical care newsletter called Estimates of the Need for Palliative Care Consultation across United States Intensive Care Units Using a Trigger-based Model. It said 1 in 7 patients need palliative care and that there are 5 triggers that indicate the patient has a poor prognosis and the healthcare team should put in a consult. It will give the patient and the family members more support and help guide them through difficult decisions. Here are the 5 triggers:

  1. ICU admission after hospital length of stay of at least 10 days
  2. failure of three or more organ systems
  3. stage IV malignancy
  4. status after cardiac arrest
  5. intracerebral hemorrhage requiring mechanical ventilation